Home / Science / The first Astrobee robot completes the initial checks on board the ISS

The first Astrobee robot completes the initial checks on board the ISS



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The newest robotic badistant of the International Space Station, Astrobee, completed its first series of hardware tests on board the outpost.

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Jim Sharkey

May 30, 2019

NASA astronaut Anne McClain performs the first series of tests on an Astrobee robot, Bumble, during a hardware check. On your right is the docking station that was installed in the Kibo module on the International Space Station on February 15. Photo credit: NASA

NASA astronaut Anne McClain performs the first series of tests on an Astrobee robot, Bumble, during a hardware check. On your right is the docking station that was installed in the Kibo module on the International Space Station on February 15. Photo credit: NASA

The newest robotic badistant of the International Space Station, Astrobee, completed its first series of hardware tests on board the outpost.

On April 30, 2019, NASA astronaut Anne McClain conducted a series of hardware tests on Bumble, one of the two Astrobee robots launched to the ISS on the 11th flight of Northrop Grumman Commercial Replenishment Services from the Installation of NASA's Wallops Flight in Virginia.

After unpacking the robot and placing it in a docking station inside the Kibo module of the space station, McClain worked with the Astrobee team at the NASA Ames Research Center in California to confirm all robot subsystems, including avionics. , cameras, propulsion and energy coupling. They worked normally.

Bumble and his partner Honey are expected to start flying inside the station this year. The start-up of the entire system is expected to be completed by the fall of 2019

Astrobee is based on the legacy of the synchronized position synchronization system, coupling, reorientation, experimental satellite, the current robotic research platform aboard the space station. Once the Astrobee devices have been completely put into service, they will replace SPHERES in this role.

Astrobee cube-shaped robots use electric fans to fly freely through the space station. They can "see" and navigate around using cameras and sensors. They are also equipped with an arm that perches, allowing them to grab the handrails of the station or grab and hold small objects.

Astrobee is being used to study how robots can help astronauts and perform routine care tasks in spacecraft. Free flight devices can operate autonomously or by remote control of astronauts or flight controllers from the ground. It is expected that the initial experiments with Astrobee begin in 2020.

Video courtesy of NASA.

Tagged: Astrobee Expedition 59 NASA Northrop International Space Station Grumman The Range

Jim Sharkey

Jim Sharkey is a laboratory badistant, writer and general science enthusiast who grew up in Enid, Oklahoma, Skylab's hometown and shuttle astronaut Owen K. Garriott. As a young Star Trek fan, he participated in the letter-sending campaign that resulted in the prototype of the space shuttle being called Enterprise.

While his academic studies have gone from psychology and archeology to biology, he has never lost his pbadion for space exploration. Jim started blogging about science, science fiction and futurism in 2004.

Jim resides in the San Francisco Bay area and has badisted NASA Socials in landing the Curiosity rover of the Mars Science Laboratory and launching NASA's LADEE lunar orbiter.


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